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Fri, Mar 24, 2017 at 7:03 AM
Issued by: Scott Toepfer

Today

 

Tomorrow

No Rating (-) Watch for signs of instability like recent avalanches, cracking, and audible collapsing. Avoid traveling on or under similar slopes.   No Rating (-) Watch for signs of instability like recent avalanches, cracking, and audible collapsing. Avoid traveling on or under similar slopes.
Moderate (2) Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully.   Moderate (2) Heightened avalanche conditions on specific terrain features. Evaluate snow and terrain carefully.
Low (1) Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.   Low (1) Generally safe avalanche conditions. Watch for unstable snow on isolated terrain features.
  Danger Scale

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Summary

Thursday nights storm brought 4 to 6 inches of new snow, colder temperatures, and moderate northerly winds. A welcome change from the recent melt down seen through most of March. The new snow brought Storm Slab avalanche back into the pictures. These will be small, but also found on all aspects, especially where new snow added up to 6 inches or more.

The Friends of CAIC have launched their spring fundraising campaign in an effort to raise $50,000 to support avalanche forecasting and education in Colorado. Every dollar counts. Donate today and support your avalanche center! https://avalanche.state.co.us/donate/

 

Recent Tweets

@CAIC: MOD (L2) New snow today and enuf fell Thursday nite to return Storm Slab avalanches to our problem list Mar 24, 7:19 AM
@CAIC: MOD (L2) today. New snow and increasing winds bring transition from spring to winter avalanche worries today. Mar 23, 7:23 AM

Avalanche Problem

 
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What You Need to Know About These Avalanches


Storm Slab avalanches release naturally during snow storms and can be triggered for a few days after a storm. They often release at or below the trigger point. They exist throughout the terrain. Avoid them by waiting for the storm snow to stabilize.

Avalanche Problem

 
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What You Need to Know About These Avalanches


Wet Slab avalanches occur when there is liquid water in the snowpack, and can release during the first few days of a warming period. Travel early in the day and avoid avalanche terrain when you see pinwheels, roller balls, loose wet avalanches, or during rain-on-snow events.

Avalanche Problem

 
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What You Need to Know About These Avalanches


Persistent Slab avalanches can be triggered days to weeks after the last storm. They often propagate across and beyond terrain features that would otherwise confine Wind and Storm Slab avalanches. In some cases they can be triggered remotely, from low-angle terrain or adjacent slopes. Give yourself a wide safety buffer to address the uncertainty.

Weather Forecast for 11,000ft Issued Sat, Mar 25, 2017 at 4:27 AM by Mike Cooperstein Statewide Weather Forecast
  Friday Friday Night Saturday
Temperature (ºF) 35 to 40 20 to 25 35 to 40
Wind Speed (mph) 5 to 15 5 to 15 0 to 10
Wind Direction S SW N
Sky Cover Increasing Overcast Partly Cloudy
Snow (in) 0 1 to 3 0 to 1

Archived Forecasts

  • Select Forecast: Valid

Fri, Mar 24, 2017 at 7:46 AM
Issued by: Scott Toepfer Statewide Weather Forecast  

Storm Slab avalanches are back in the picture. Thursday nights storm brought 6+ inches of new snow to the Grand Mesa. It is possible today that the Thursday night snow has now developed into Storm Slab avalanches on a wide variety of aspects near treeline. In general these should be manageable, but don't combine a Storm Slab avalanche with a terrain trap, as then all bets are off.

The state returns to a progressive and stormy cycle. We won't have much space between storms, so depend on near daily changes in the avalanche danger and problem list.


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Five Day Trend

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Tomorrow

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Avalanche Observations
No relevant backcountry observations found for this forecast

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Field Reports
Report Date Observer Snowpack Obs Avalanches Media

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Weather Observations
Station Date Time Temperature Relative Humidity Wind Speed Wind Direction Max Gust 24 Hr Snow
Grand Mesa - Skyway Point Sat Mar 25 6:00 AM 23 89 8 172 14 1.3
Mesa Lakes Sat Mar 25 4:00 AM 31 - - - - -
Overland Res. Sat Mar 25 4:00 AM 22 - - - - -
Park Reservoir Sat Mar 25 4:00 AM 19 - - - - -

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