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Thu, Jul 11, 2019 at 9:45 AM
Issued by: Spencer Logan

Today

 

Tomorrow

No Rating (-) Watch for signs of instability like recent avalanches, cracking, and audible collapsing. Avoid traveling on or under similar slopes.   No Rating (-) Watch for signs of instability like recent avalanches, cracking, and audible collapsing. Avoid traveling on or under similar slopes.
No Rating (-) Watch for signs of instability like recent avalanches, cracking, and audible collapsing. Avoid traveling on or under similar slopes.   No Rating (-) Watch for signs of instability like recent avalanches, cracking, and audible collapsing. Avoid traveling on or under similar slopes.
No Rating (-) Watch for signs of instability like recent avalanches, cracking, and audible collapsing. Avoid traveling on or under similar slopes.   No Rating (-) Watch for signs of instability like recent avalanches, cracking, and audible collapsing. Avoid traveling on or under similar slopes.
  Danger Scale

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Summary

We issued our last Statewide Avalanche forecast for the 2018-19 season. You can find general guidance on spring and summer avalanche safety here. Our next scheduled update is November 1, 2019. We will continue to monitor snowpack and weather conditions through the summer, and will issue updates if we anticipate unusually dangerous avalanche conditions before then. Thanks for another great season!

 
Weather Forecast for 11,000ft Issued Thu, Jul 11, 2019 at 9:54 AM by Spencer Logan Statewide Weather Forecast
  Thursday Night Friday Friday Night
Temperature (ºF) 58 to 63 63 to 68 58 to 63
Wind Speed (mph) 2 to 12 0 to 10 1 to 11
Wind Direction SSE WNW SSE
Sky Cover Partly Cloudy Mostly Cloudy Mostly Cloudy
Snow (in) 0 0 0

Archived Forecasts

  • Select Forecast: Valid

Wed, May 1, 2019 at 6:50 AM
Issued by: Brian Lazar Statewide Weather Forecast  

That was a nice little storm to close out April. The Central Mountains generally picked up around a foot of dense new snow in the last couple days, with snow water equivalent of around 1 to 2 inches. Schofield SNOTEL site picked up 3.5 inches of water with 22 inches of snow.  

This is enough new snow by itself to create Storm Slab avalanches in areas that picked up more than about 10 inches. Warm spring temperatures will promote rapid settlement in the new snow, and you will be able to trigger avalanches 6 to 10 inches thick even in sheltered areas. Strong west to southwest winds are building fresh wind-drifted slabs. The slabs forming on northwest to east to southeast-facing slopes will be thicker (up to 3 or even 4 feet deep) and stiffer. This means avalanches on these slopes will be bigger and more dangerous. 

There is a lot of new storm snow sitting out there, and it's bound to shed off the old snow surface with wet avalanches. This could start this afternoon at lower elevations. It's the first day of May, and the sun will have a significant impact on the new snow. It won’t take much sun for the new snow to start sluffing down-slope. With snow depths around a foot or more, there will be enough new snow for sluffs to entrain additional snow creating larger piles at the bottoms of slopes or in terrain traps.

This is the last day of 10-zone forecasts for the season.  We will continue to issue daily regional (Northern, Central, and Southern Mountains) forecasts and danger ratings through May. Get daily updates at our website colorado.gov/avalanche and please continue to send us your observations! 


  • Small sluff in Coon Basin on an east aspect, near treeline. (full)
  • West Elk Wilderness. The cornice gouged to the ground and produced a very large D3 avalanche on a north face at 12,200ft. (full)
  • Tests on a tiny, but steep slope showed sluffing only a couple inches down. (full)
  • Collapsing and cracking in very shallow areas below treeline where a thin, breakable slab sits on wet depth hoar below. (full)
  • Rolling collapses, triggered by the weight of a sled. (full)
  • A large Wet Slab avalanche from May 2018 in a shallow snowpack area. (full)
  • Natural wet slab avalanche from road bank, March 27, 2019. (full)

See more photos & videos

Five Day Trend

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  • No Rating
  • 1
    Low
  • 2
    Moderate
  • 3
    Considerable
  • 4
    High
  • 5
    Extreme
Avalanche Observations
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Field Reports
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Weather Observations
Station Date Time Temperature Relative Humidity Wind Speed Wind Direction Max Gust 24 Hr Snow
Mesa Lakes Sat Aug 17 6:00 PM 62 - - - - -
Park Reservoir Sat Aug 17 5:00 PM 65 - - - - -

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