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Thu, Jul 11, 2019 at 9:46 AM
Issued by: Spencer Logan

Today

 

Tomorrow

No Rating (-) Watch for signs of instability like recent avalanches, cracking, and audible collapsing. Avoid traveling on or under similar slopes.   No Rating (-) Watch for signs of instability like recent avalanches, cracking, and audible collapsing. Avoid traveling on or under similar slopes.
No Rating (-) Watch for signs of instability like recent avalanches, cracking, and audible collapsing. Avoid traveling on or under similar slopes.   No Rating (-) Watch for signs of instability like recent avalanches, cracking, and audible collapsing. Avoid traveling on or under similar slopes.
No Rating (-) Watch for signs of instability like recent avalanches, cracking, and audible collapsing. Avoid traveling on or under similar slopes.   No Rating (-) Watch for signs of instability like recent avalanches, cracking, and audible collapsing. Avoid traveling on or under similar slopes.
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Summary

We issued our last Statewide Avalanche forecast for the 2018-19 season. You can find general guidance on spring and summer avalanche safety here. Our next scheduled update is November 1, 2019. We will continue to monitor snowpack and weather conditions through the summer, and will issue updates if we anticipate unusually dangerous avalanche conditions before then. Thanks for another great season!

 
Weather Forecast for 11,000ft Issued Thu, Jul 11, 2019 at 9:54 AM by Spencer Logan Statewide Weather Forecast
  Thursday Night Friday Friday Night
Temperature (ºF) 53 to 58 63 to 68 51 to 56
Wind Speed (mph) 1 to 11 0 to 10 2 to 12
Wind Direction NNE NNW N
Sky Cover Mostly Cloudy Overcast Overcast
Snow (in) 0 0 0

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Wed, May 1, 2019 at 6:46 AM
Issued by: Brian Lazar Statewide Weather Forecast  

That was a nice little storm to close out April. The Southern Mountains generally picked up around a foot of dense new snow in the last couple days, with snow water equivalent of around 1 to 2 inches. Wolf Creek picked up 2.7 inches of water with Spud Mountain and Vallecito coming in second with 2.3 inches. 

The new snow is deep enough in itself to create Storm Slab avalanches. Slopes that received more than 8 inches of snow are the most likely areas to trigger one of these fresh slabs. Strong southwest winds drifted snow into thicker and stiffer slabs near and above treeline. Drifts will be more widespread on slopes facing north to east through south and avalanches on theses slopes will be larger and more dangerous. Look for warning signs like surface cracks and avoid lens-shaped pillows or textured snow to reduce your avalanche risk.

There is a lot of new storm snow sitting out there, and it's bound to shed off the old snow surface with wet avalanches. This could start this afternoon at lower elevations. It's the first day of May, and the sun will have a significant impact on the new snow. It won’t take much sun for the new snow to start sluffing down-slope. With snow depths around a foot or more, there will be enough new snow for sluffs to entrain additional snow creating larger piles at the bottoms of slopes or in terrain traps.

This is the last day of 10-zone forecasts for the season.  We will continue to issue daily regiona (Northern, Central, and Southern Mountains) forecasts and danger ratings through May. Get daily updates at our website colorado.gov/avalanche and please continue to send us your observations! 


  • CAIC forecasters provide an end of the season snowpack update for the San Juan Mountains. The CAIC will issue daily weather and regional avalanche forecast through May 31. Please continue to submit observations to our website at colorado.gov/avalanche.
  • Large, overhanging cornices dot the landscape. Be mindful of these monsters as we get deeper into spring. Some are starting to crack along ridge lines and can break farther back than you might expect. Give them a wide berth during periods of prolonged above freezing temperatures. (full)

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Five Day Trend

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  • No Rating
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Avalanche Observations
No relevant backcountry observations found for this forecast

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Field Reports
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Weather Observations
Station Date Time Temperature Relative Humidity Wind Speed Wind Direction Max Gust 24 Hr Snow
Columbus Basin Sat Aug 17 5:00 PM 64 - - - - 2.0
Cumbres Trestle Sat Aug 17 5:00 PM 66 - 2 9 - 25.0
Lily Pond Sat Aug 17 5:00 PM 64 - - - - 2.0
Wolf Creek Summit Sat Aug 17 5:00 PM 65 - - - - -

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